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  • Risk Awareness Workshop

    Learn to identify the residual risk of a project or the company as a part of planning the project or service​ We learn the basics of risk management: SWOT, PESTLE, DPIA and ISO31000 through pragmatic stories in groups​ Attendees can be project managers, quality managers or data protection managers that need risk awareness in their daily working​. End result of this workshop is risk oriented thinking, counting the residual risk and materials of the course: attendees will get the risk management toolbox used in the workshop (as long as the elements aren't behind a license)​ Workshop is suitable for HR, communications, risk managers (finance), directors, project managers and service managers​.

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Blog Posts (10)

  • Secrets of a role of a coder (aka Developer)

    Coding is a bit different skill in Tech than other skills. For some, it is a good selection, but for some, not that much. I began coding in early childhood and worked my way up step by step in Tech, continuously learning. I have seen behaviors of many kinds. The question is how do you like to spend your time at work. With people, or less with people? Resolving complex problems requires more uninterrupted time than many other job functions in Tech and therefore developer roles are vulnerable to interruptions. It is closer to a research role as it requires a lot of thinking and not that much talking. Of course, reflecting on others is a big part, but it is different than in other roles in Tech. Hence, it is a horror to see people who code working in noisy and busy spaces, instead of silent rooms. All the noise and hassle around will most definitely increase the brain's negative wiring and stress due to constant interruption in the flow and it also will have a severe impact on the efficiency and timelines. Overcoming the biases in developer recruiting and team building Sometimes I see bias in recruitment, or for instance, in DevOps team planning because if you are a coder, you are a loner, and of course, you need to be a people-hating introvert. The reason for this is a lack of understanding of the role. You can try with a timer of how your brain reacts when you take a puzzle that is a bit more complex to solve and ask someone to interrupt, walk by, ask or speak on the phone next to you. Then try it without interruptions. What is the difference between interrupted and uninterrupted time? Therefore there are different skills in Tech. Not everyone will become a developer or learn how to code properly. No-code and low-code will help to some extent. Bad habits of learning and unlearning them to be successful in learning Bad habits that I have found when some of the people first time come to my class to learn: 1. Expectation setting. I have seen some creating an overwhelming emotion by setting the bar themselves and being stressed before they have even started to learn. 2. Competition, trying to be better than those who have much more experience. These bad habits I typically train people away from, because they are actually obstacles in successful learning. And successful they have also become after. Setting too high expectations and focusing on others makes us being overwhelmed before learning, and internal competition just nourishes a poor culture, which costs approx. 67% of the efficiency of a team. That's why bad habits need to go. One of my students once said: "I find this positive environment to have an impact on my learning skills, I seem to learn faster and more when I let loose and have a bit of fun as well" Well said! You can read more about our EDULINE100 concept here. We developed a program, that helps companies to enable their employees to become the best professionals in Tech! Tessa, Founder of Techie Stories

  • Former Cybersecurity Field CTO at Microsoft, CISO at IBM, GM at Symantec Zoom visiting lecturer!

    When my students had a question about how to sell Cyber Security without threats to C-Suite, I decided to ask Diana Kelley to visit in one of my lectures. My students have been asking from the beginning about hearing actual stories from the field. I decided to surprise them! It was amazing to see so many students inspired by Diana Kelley’s visiting my Cybersecurity for Business- lecture at Metropolia University of Applied Sciences. I want to thank Diana for accepting the invitation and the added value for my students! Diana has been in Tech for over 30 years. She has been working in C-Suite (Cybersecurity Field CTO at Microsoft, CISO at IBM, General manager at Symantec), co-authored books about Cryptographic Libraries For Developers and Practical Cybersecurity Architecture: A Guide to Creating and Implementing Robust Designs for Cybersecurity Architects. She has inspired many people during her career, including me. The first time I heard Diana speaking was at the Cybersecurity Nordics event for thousands of people. What I was inspired by was her understanding of business to technical detail. I had an opportunity to discuss with other great women in Cyber Security. They were working either in business development or management. Some of them were working in forensics and STEM-related Cyber Security roles. The most fascinating was that they were not only good at a business perspective, but they all were also highly skilled in processes and technology. The feedback Diana’s lecture received was astonishing. The students were able to dig their way out from the technical perspective to the C-suite level. This shift is difficult, I agree. When a comfort zone is in technical binaries, it is always hard to shift the mindset towards business. Many times we are missing actual company goals when it comes to Cyber Security. It is about securing businesses, not only about all the threats that are lurking around. It is about the impact on the strategy and the business goals. Business Planning requires risk planning. The same risk models apply to Cyber Security as it does for business in general. The most known models are PESTLE (Political, Economical, Social, Technology, Legal, Environmental) and SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats). So why so many companies are pulling the plug when it comes to Cyber Security and deciding to outsource even the most critical roles? It is all about communication. Even though negativity might get viewers on social media, it does not resonate with C-suite professionals. One of the anecdotes in Diana’s lecture was about understanding where the listener is. Think about going to a doctor. If the first thing the doctor would say to you was cancer, without diagnosing first. How would this make you feel? In business, the same thing applies. C-suite is responsible for the company, its employees, its business. If you tell them at first that they have all the threats in the world, they will stop listening. Typical topics in the mainstream media are mainly about the leaks and the threats. Trying to sell and market with threats causes people to react by pulling away from the topic. Securing business crown jewels and goals should be the center of the discussions. The same applies when it comes to demographics in the Cyber Security field. Over 80% of the companies have outsourced Cyber Security in Finland, according to Etla Digibarometri 2020 study https://www.etla.fi/julkaisut/digibarometri-2020-kyberturvan-tilannekuva-suomessa/. Seldom do I see Cyber Security as part of the business as usual functions, such as in Business Development, Product Development, Quality Management, Enterprise Risk Management. I believe it is time to build, By Design and By Default Cyber Security instead of building Silos. When Cyber Security is business as usual, the milestone marks the start of a new chapter.

  • Meet our new Data Economy Advisor Jarkko Moilanen Ph.D

    Jarkko defended his doctoral dissertation on 3D printing focused Peer Production: Revolution in design, development and manufacturing, and the related dissertation is one of the few works describing the 3D printing ecosystem. The dissertation consists of articles, all of which have been co-written with other researchers. Jarkko's way of working as a writer is to collaborate with others instead of writing everything himself. In October 2017, Jarkko got the idea to write an API Economics book and came up with the name "API Economy 101". The title reflects the purpose of the book, which is to provide a basic package of API economics information to people in charge of business, rather than addressing the issue from a technology perspective. Jarkko invited 3 other experts in the field he knew to participate in the writing process. The book was published under an ideological name in August 2018 by Alma Talent. The book was translated into 2019 in English as "API Economy 101". In the autumn of 2018, Jarkko began working on a new book in English on "Build for Developers - Application Developers as Customers in API Economy". Jarkko also invited other experts in the field to this work, but this time in the role of advisors. The invitees mainly represent application developers, i.e. typical API economy customers and interface consumers. As the writing work progressed slowly, Jarkko decided to try a new approach from July 2019 onwards. He started writing one developer-related writing a day for his own writing series called 100 Days DX. The last summary article in the series was completed on November 6, 2019. Editing the material for the book is in progress. At the same time as 100 Days DX was completed, Jarkko began the video production developer experience of business significance. Doctor of Developer eXperience includes approximately 10-15 minutes of informative videos, often based on scientific articles. In November 2019 Jarkko started to develop Data Product Toolkit, which is a set of canvases to design data products which are the building blocks of the data economy. Data productizement process and tools are part of the research aimed at Jarkko's second dissertation.

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Pages (35)

  • About | Techie Stories

    ABOUT Techie Stories Ⓡ was founded in October 16th of 2020. ​ We have a solid partner network and customer base from higly regulated industries such as pharmaceutical, medtech, laboratory, finance and public sector with proven track record and references. ​ Most of our regulated industry clients are international companies operating in multiple countries. What We Do 01 We solve complex business problems and find best-fit solutions for our customers 02 We add value by introducing the top of the art and best business-fit solutions for our customers 03 We design and create business concepts and models to help our customers businesses to thrive 04 We deliver what we promise and our goal is always to become a trusted advisor for each of our customers 05 We share our knowledge OUR VISION To empower brilliant minds to solve problems that matter in this world with top of the art technology. OUR MISSION Transforming businesses towards sustainable growth; practices that are repeatable and ethical OUR VALUES Better laughs, better trust, better results EXECUTIVE AND ADVISORS SaaS Adviser Jarkko Moilanen PhD Data Economy Adviser MARKUS LEIMAN Tessa Viitanen Founder and CEO Jukka- Pekka Joensuu Senior Executive Adviser Marjukka Niinioja Senior Partner Founder of Osaango

  • | Techie Stories

    Cloud grasp! ​ ​ Memberships starting from 500 €/month (VAT 0%) Human-centric learning path Best courses for your organization Publisher M/LMS platform-neutral in common courses A separate platform for your products and services training to support your clients Knowledge gap-analysis with our fast track automated method Book! Getting Ready to Learn?

  • | Techie Stories

    AUDITING ​ A General audit provides an overall view of the level, effectiveness, and compliance of the company's IT processes. ​ Administrative security auditing gives an idea of ​​the maturity and effectiveness of security management. It can be used to assess the level of compliance and to anticipate possible shortcomings. ​ GAP audit assesses the ability of an organisation to meet the requirements of the standard and the workload to achieve the minimum level specified by the standard. After the audit, the organisation has an understanding of the work required for certification. Note! certification can only be given by an accredited body. This audit does not produce certification. Supplier auditing supports the organisation in supplier quality, security, or compliance audits by participating in the development of the audit plan, surveying, and self-auditing, and reporting with the organisation. Audits provide insight into supplier risks and address the root causes of quality deviations. ​ Example frameworks that can be used for auditing purposes ​ ISO9001 ISO27xxx ISO28000 (ISO31000, risk framework) GxP ​ Contact for more information >

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